The 7 Deadly Sins of Louis Vuitton

LV are two initials instantly recognized by the fashion world. Majestic flagship stores grace every major avenue, spawning locations in every fashion hub from Paris to Marrakech (and yes, there’s even one on the island of Guam). Celebrities, businesswomen, and mothers alike gleefully fork over the greenbacks to snag their own trusty Neo Neverfulls. Luxury-hungry teenagers dream about the famed Speedy. While Louis Vuitton remains an iconic designer label, its golden reign is not a pristine one. Amidst controversies and rumors, this French fashion house is certainly not immune from the occasional flaw. Don’t let its glossy appearance fool you – look past the lavish exterior and you may just unearth the seven deadly sins of Louis Vuitton.




1. Allegedly 99% of all Louis Vuitton bags in the world are fake.

While scouring the web, I could find no official information to back this fact up. However, while this rumor may still be in the gray, the thought of your treasured $1,000 LV bag as “fake” is enough to produce a horror movie. Perhaps the alarming amount of Louis Vuitton knock-offs has blurred the lines of real verses fake, but it is certainly not soothing to know that your pricey LV could have a creepily similar sibling.

 

2. Louis Vuitton burns all of their unsold merchandise at the end of the year.

Ever wondered why you could never catch a LV sale? That’s because they don’t even exist! According to OMG Facts, Louis Vuitton burns their leftover merchandise in order to maintain the label’s value. After all, if there were to be precious LV bags floating around cyberspace with a 50% mark-off, the brand would quickly lose its notoriously priced reputation and the more expensive options would lose consumers.

3. In Russia, a large Louis Vuitton trunk was installed in the sacred Red Square until the Russian presidential administration ordered it to be removed.

The Huffington Post writes that Louis Vuitton came under fire for installing its grandiose, two-story trunk in Red Square, right next to Vladimir Lenin’s grave. Sergei Obukhov of the Communist Party Central Committee states that “[The Red Square] is a sacred place for the Russian state” and that “symbols cannot be trivialized or denigrated”. Though LV did promptly remove its life-size trunk, it is unsettling to think of a luxury fashion advertisement in such a historically significant location.

4. Louis Vuitton made negative headlines after releasing an advertisement promoting “prostitution chic”.

 

Love Magazine for Louis Vuitton from ART+VIBES on Vimeo.

In yet another controversial move, Louis Vuitton released a short film produced by LOVE Magazine to promote its Autumn/Winter 2013 collection. However, the film is anything but PG; the advertisement featured models prancing in lingerie and fur coats in the Parisian dark alleyways, supposedly to give off the idea of girls “working the streets”. Many media outlets criticized LV for supposedly glamorizing the idea of prostitution.

5. After being denied a meeting with the VP of Louis Vuitton, Kanye West called for a boycott on all LV goods.

The Celebrity Café reported that West requested to meet with Yves Carcelle, vice president of the Louis Vuitton fashion house. However, West was denied his request and in response, urged his fans to avoid buying LV products. The rapper even went as far as to declaring that he has major influence that the LV house has failed to notice. While both West and LV are at blame for this blip here, this incident did not bode to well for LV’s publicity side.

6. Leaked photos of Michael Phelps in a Louis Vuitton ad could violate the International Olympic Committee’s Rule 40.

 

In 2012, leaked Louis Vuitton ad photographs featuring Olympic star Michael Phelps became a controversy after it was revealed that Phelps could be stripped of his medals since Rule 40 states that athletes cannot promote any non-Olympic sponsors for a duration of time. Yahoo Sports says that both LV and Phelps denied releasing the photos, though it sure painted Louis Vuitton under the negative limelight.

7. Louis Vuitton was sued over racist comments said by a store manager.

A store manager in London allegedly made racist remarks towards African-Americans and Asians, resulting in a former employee suing the fashion house. Fashionista writes that the racist statements were so intense that the employee recorded the store manager for further proof. Despite its highly regarded reputation, Louis Vuitton seems to suffer from racial discrimination as well.

 

by Kelsey Nguyen